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$50,000 Down Payment Assistance Available For Amherst!

Valley CDC would like to let our clients, friends, community partners and neighbors know about an exciting new program funded by the Town of Amherst to assist first time homebuyers to buy their first home in Amherst.

 

  • Schedule an appointment with the Homeownership Coordinator
  • Agree to all terms and conditions of the mortgage subsidy program
  • Have the ability to obtain a mortgage loan and pay closing costs
  • Attend a first time homebuyer workshop

 

Applications will be accepted until March 31, 2017.

 

Now is the time to meet with the Homeownership Coordinator to get ready to take advantage of this opportunity.  Qualified buyers will have the opportunity to shop for a home for a 90 day period beginning in April 2017 and enter into a purchase and sales agreement for a home or condo located in Amherst.

 

If you or anyone you know is thinking about buying a home, please pass along this information.  Thanks for helping us get the word out.

 

Income and eligibility restrictions apply.  For more information, please contact Donna Cabana, Homeownership Coordinator – 413.586.5855 x 180 or dc@valleycdc.com

Community Investment Tax Credit: A Big Impact for Valley CDC

violas

In 2014, the Commonwealth rolled out the Community Investment Tax Credit (CITC) Program awarding $3 million in credits to 38 participating organizations from across the Commonwealth. At Valley CDC, we raised approximately 87% of our goal that first year. In 2015, the Commonwealth doubled our award and we raised 150% more in 2015 than 2014. While this is not all new money (it includes existing donors who increased their giving level), it has made a significant impact on the work that we undertake.

We were successful in utilizing all of its 2015 credits as well as the remaining 2014 credits, raising a total of $213,672.

Increasing capacity is vital to ensuring that underserved populations in our service area have access to all levels of homeownership assistance, small business assistance as many people seek self-employment, and affordable housing both for families and individuals, including homes for individuals/families experiencing homelessness.

The success and impact of our 2015 CITC campaign has increased our cash on hand which helps to eliminate stress on the day-to-day operation of the agency. Additionally, we were able to recruit a real estate project manager this spring, which allows us to increase our housing development capacity.

We successfully completed our 38-unit family development – Parsons Village in Easthampton – in August 2015 and all families were in their new homes by mid-October. We are now poised to get funded for the redevelopment of the Northampton Lumber Yard into 55 units of family housing in downtown Northampton.

The success of our CITC campaign has also allowed us to utilize a highly skilled consultant to bring us through a robust strategic alliance and strategic planning process that includes a commitment both to expanded community engagement activities and a real focus on diversity and inclusion. Our July 2016 board retreat focused on diversity and inclusion.

The legislature and the Commonwealth are already seeing the results that the community development field projected would come of this generous tax credit as MACDC aggregates data from the CITC participants. It is truly making an impact on the lives of low- and moderate-income people and other underserved populations in Hampshire County.

Why Develop A Business Plan?

Planning Your Business #1: Why Develop a Business Plan?

business plan

Why should you develop a business plan?  While you know what you’re planning to do, writing a business plan provides you the opportunity to think and decide about how you’re going to make your business a success.  Developing three years financial projections enables you to determine that your business will generate the income you require or need.  Developing reasonable financial projections requires that you perform substantial market research to determine the level of interest in purchasing your products/services, and how much they will pay for them.

 

 

 

What About Credit Inquiries?

Q & A

 A Question From Our First Time Homebuyer Workshop

Question

I want to order my credit report but I’ve heard that credit inquiries lower your credit score. Is that correct?

 

Answer

Whether a credit inquiry affects your credit score depends on who’s asking. Requesting information on your own credit won’t affect your credit score and in fact, it’s strongly recommended.

Here’s how it works: When a business or individual asks about your credit, it’s called an “inquiry.” Credit inquiries are either “hard” inquiries” or “soft inquiries” and there’s an important difference:

  • Hard inquiries: A hard inquiry can lower your credit score. These happen when you apply for credit from a lender or other business and you authorize them to check your credit as part of the application process. Examples are applying for a mortgage, an auto loan, or a credit card.
  • Soft inquiries. Soft inquiries do not affect your credit score. Examples are when you request your own credit report, when a landlord checks your credit for an apartment rental, and when employers check your credit as part of a hiring process. Credit card companies may also perform soft credit inquiries by checking your credit without your knowledge or authorization. If you didn’t request the credit or authorize the credit check, then the company is performing a soft inquiry.

Recommendations

  • Don’t apply for new credit cards, store cards, auto loans, etc. when you’re shopping for a mortgage. These are all “hard inquiries”. The impact on your credit score varies but it can add up. Even if you only lose a few points, lenders will see the inquiries on your credit report and may be concerned about your intention to increase your debt while applying for a mortgage. (If you do create significant additional debt while applying for a mortgage, the added payments may have a negative impact on your eligibility for a loan.)

The only credit you should apply for when shopping for a mortgage is the mortgage itself!

  • Do check your own credit report and correct any errors. Instructions are included in the reports. Your credit is a major factor when you apply for a mortgage, so make sure all the information about your finances is correct.

The Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) requires each of the nationwide credit reporting companies — Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion — to provide you with a free copy of your credit report, at your request, once every 12 months to ensure that the information on all of your credit reports is correct and up to date.

We recommend www.annualcreditreport.com to order your free credit reports and if you wish, your credit scores (scores require a fee).

Learn more at www.annualcreditreport.com or visit www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/0155-free-credit-reports and www.consumerfinance.gov/askcfpb/search?selected_facets=category_exact:credit-reporting

 

Fern Selesnick, Homeownership Education Coordinator

 

What you need to know about the MHP One loan

house for saleQ&A

Question:

Hi Donna,

I know that the One Mortgage is a conventional loan, but what are the rules for the home inspection?  Asbestos siding, lead paint, etc.  Does the bank do the inspection or does it follow some other rules for inspecting?  I’m buying a “For Sale by Owner” but I do have a real estate sales agent and an attorney working on my behalf.

Thanks,

Buyer

 

Answer:

Dear Buyer,

The structural, mechanical inspection, or home inspection that you pay for covers just that; the structure and mechanics of the home.  Lead paint, asbestos, mold, radon, or water quality tests are separate inspections that you have to pay for in addition to the home inspection.  The home inspector should advise you if you need any of these or any other additional inspections based on what is seen at the property at the time of the inspection.  Inspections are recommended but not required in the home buying process or by the lender.  Its buyer beware though; once you sign at the closing it’s all yours issues and all.  This is why you have the inspection period, so you know what you are buying.  If you choose not to inspect, the real estate sales agent will have you sign a waiver, because it’s that important.  Sellers may not disclose all the information they know about the house.  Hopefully the sales agent asks for a signed “Statement of Condition of the Property”   Due to this being a “for sale by owner,” this probably is not the case because it’s the seller’s agent’s responsibility to ask for this document to be completed.  You should ask for this form to be completed prior to having your inspection.

The bank will not inspect the property.  However, they will send out an appraiser to determine the value.  The appraiser is looking at the condition of the property as to how it effects the value and looking to see that the house livable.  Government-insured loans, such as VA or FHA, go a step further and will care about chipping, peeling paint, the life of a roof, and other health and safety conditions that may be present at the property.  Sometimes these conditions effect your ability to get an FHA loan.  They will not allow chipping paint or a roof that has less than 3 years of life remaining.
Donna Cabana

Homeownership Coordinator

Solid Foundations

Why I Support Valley CDC
Guest Post By Felicity Hardee, Board PresidentFelicity Hardee Casual portrait

Now that Valley CDC has successfully completed the fifth annual Pedal Poker Run (many, many thanks to our sponsors and supporters who rode on a beautiful October day), I am reflecting more on why I support Valley CDC and the many other community development organizations I serve. There are so many reasons this work is important. Here are three things that really drive me to do as much as I can:

• The Need. We are so lucky to live in the most prosperous nation on earth and yet, all around us, others are struggling to get by. Particularly after the recession, many families find it hard to make ends meet. One can live in one of the most affluent zip codes in the country, and homelessness is out of control. Working mothers and fathers are having to choose between staying home with a sick child and going to work so they can pay their bills. That is just plain wrong. Every one of us has the obligation to do what we can to help.

• We Can Make A Difference in Our Own Backyard. Community development corporations work locally, right where the families are that need help. The funds we raise benefit families, senior citizens and small businesses where we are. That is so powerful; groups of us, working together for the common good or, in the case of Massachusetts, the CommonWealth.

• My Dad. When I was growing up, it was expected that everyone gave back to their communities. One of my favorite photos of my dad is him behind a desk, looking over some papers at the Community Music School in Brooklyn. He is just looking up as the photo is snapped and he is, at that moment, fully invested in doing the right thing for that nonprofit. “To those to whom much has been given, much is expected.” -John F. Kennedy.

So . . . get involved! Donate! And know that when you do, you are helping someone here, in your area, whose life will be changed by your support.

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Get Involved

Valley CDC provides a variety of community economic development programs and services to low and moderate income residents of Northampton, Easthampton, Amherst and Hadley. To volunteer, join a committee or learn about becoming a Board member, please send us an email. Read More about “Get Involved”